Editorials

Hudson, Latinos seek fresh start

The Hudson Board of Selectmen should be commended for hosting a special meeting with members of the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs on Monday to dispel the notion that the community is not a welcoming place for Latinos. The meeting was prompted by some disparaging ...

Frankly, Guinta has a lot to say

How much is constituent service worth to you in the form of taxpayer-funded mailings when you elect a congressman to represent you in Washington? If that’s at the top of your list, then you will be happy to know that U.S. Rep. Frank Guinta spent more on these so-called ...

Public has right to see Ebel report

In the course of a week, the members of the Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative School District went from being in the middle of a scandal to becoming a scandal themselves. Superintendent of Schools Trevor Ebel resigned last week after an audit found inappropriate expenses charged to the School ...

Editorial: Series examines O’Brien the man

William O’Brien rattled the Republican Party establishment in November 2010 when he cleverly outflanked opponents and won the coveted leadership post of speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives. By year’s end, he made bold moves to reshape Granite State ...

No need to rush Medicaid contract

Buried in the midst of a 154-item agenda, the state’s Executive Council last week took up the matter of privatizing the New Hampshire’s Medicaid system. It was the second time the group has considered a contract for private companies to run the state’s health care ...

Don’t know what to say about poll

For those who may have missed it, there was a fascinating nugget of information in the latest WMUR Granite State Poll released Wednesday by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center. No, it wasn’t that state voters are pretty evenly split between those who approve of the job ...

Student loan hike mired in politics

One of the more exasperating traits of our dysfunctional Congress is that even in those rare instances when members actually agree to do something, they can’t help but find ways to disagree how to do it. This time it’s interest rates on federally subsidized student loans, ...

Primary season not over in NH

There is nothing new or surprising about New Hampshire commanding the attention of the nation in the months leading up to the presidential primary elections every four years. After all, that’s pretty much been the case ever since the emergence of the modern-day primary in 1952, when ...

Taking dim view of streetlight plan

So this is what it has come down to: Our state government is so financially strapped that it is considering turning off streetlights this summer to save money, a move that some municipal officials fear could put public safety at risk. Can digging for loose change behind the seat cushions be ...

Malpractice bill not right solution

A Senate bill aimed at reducing the malpractice financial exposure facing doctors and their insurance companies is ill-conceived and unlikely to achieve its intentions. SB 406 touts the concept of an “early offer” as one means of avoiding lengthy and costly jury trials in ...

Don’t be fooled by income tax ban

One reason for the enduring success of the U.S. Constitution is that it concentrates on setting broad principles of governance while steering clear of public policy dictates. America is the strongest nation in the world because the Constitution provides government the leeway to adapt and ...

Ryan plan widens US income gap

In a meeting with the Concord Monitor editorial board this month, 2nd District congressman Charlie Bass defended his vote for the controversial budget crafted by Wisconsin Republican Rep. Paul Ryan. Bass said the Ryan budget wasn’t his first choice. He preferred a bipartisan plan ...

Bass talking like a moderate again

Is U.S. Rep. Charles Bass the bipartisan reformer who stood with 15 of his fellow House Republicans in backing the Simpson-Bowles deficit reduction plan last month, which went down to defeat by a resounding 382-38 vote? Or is he the party loyalist who voted in lockstep with every other ...

Over at Bronstein, silence not golden

For elected officials, determining the right time to share pertinent information with constituents is oftentimes a no-win situation. If you tell them too soon, you run the risk of agitating them for nothing. If you tell them too late, after they’ve already heard rumors from other ...

No more stalling on school safety

Five years ago, the Board of Education agreed to hire a consultant at a cost of $71,900 to conduct a detailed assessment of security at the city’s schools. Four years ago, W.L. Bliss Associates Inc. – a Massachusetts firm that specializes in school security – ...

Primary turnout a GOP concern?

Given the Republican obsession with making President Barack Obama a one-term president, we would have expected GOP faithful to be setting all kinds of turnout records during this year’s primary nominating contests to ensure they end up with the strongest candidate come November. And ...

Credit card caper demands answers

Wilton-Lyndeborough Superintendent of Schools Trevor Ebel has some explaining to do. The School District credit card that was issued to him and bore his name has some questionable purchases on it. There are bills from grocery stores and gift shops. There are charges for limousines, alcohol ...

How do you make sense out of this?

Cradled by Stratham, Portsmouth, North Hampton and Rye, nestled against Great Bay and split in half by Interstate 95, Greenland epitomizes the iconic New Hampshire blended community. Rooted in more than two centuries of proud history and punctuated with idyllic rural landscapes, Greenland ...

Let’s put an end to redress panel

The House Redress of Grievances Committee is an artifact of Colonial-era New Hampshire that for 150 years remained embalmed in the state constitution. Last year, House Speaker Bill O’Brien summoned the committee back from the dead, ostensibly to serve as a check on the power of the ...

Wheeler rail vote still defies reason

N o one expected any minds to change when Executive Councilor David Wheeler, R-Milford, sat down with the Board of Aldermen earlier this week to explain why he voted against a rail study it had strongly endorsed. Not Wheeler. Not the aldermen. And certainly not us. But that doesn’t ...